Friday, 23 June 2017

The 19 Coolest Things To Do With A Basement (PHOTOS)

It's hard Best Home Improvement College Station to see past the limitations of a basement. The space is often dark, damp and unfinished. But a few talented designers were able to see the potential. If we ever won the lottery, we might try one of these really awesome ideas.



All photos via Houzz.com.

Create A Giant Playhouse



Have The Bar Of Your Dreams

Photo by John G. Wilbanks Photography, Inc.

Make A Game Area

Create A Den

Two Words: Wine Cellar

Play Ping-Pong In Peace

Have A Nice Quiet Place To Watch TV

Create A Space To Store Your LEGO Collection

Make A "Loft"-Style Living Space

Add Tons Of Storage

Have An Indoor Hockey Match, Whenever You Want

Let The Kids Take Over

Or Let The http://www.bhg.com/home-improvement/remodeling/ Adults Take Over With A Brewery

Hold Band Practice

Add A Kitchenette

Make Your Own Art Studio

Create Your Own Sports Memorabilia Museum

Work Out Without Being Bothered

Go For A Swim

For more great basement ideas, check out these great stories from our friends at Houzz:

Contractor Tips: Finish Your Basement the Right Way

How to Get Your Basement Lighting Right

Love these photos? Then you'll love Houzz, the ultimate site for finding interior design Best Home Improvement ideas -- along with the remodeling professionals, local residential architects and home builders in your area who can carry out your dream home visions.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/09/cool-basements_n_4747813.html

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Landscape Paper-101 - InfoBarrel

Use landscape-paper where you want to kill weeds. Cover the landscape-paper with mulch; the paper rots down after a year, allowing you to hoe the ground to keep those weeds under control.

Some weeds need light to germinate, to start growing. All plants need light to keep growing. Even perennial, deep-rooted weeds like dock weed will exhaust their stored food supply and die if they cannot photosynthesise because light is excluded.



Mulch does a good job of excluding any light; it also stops wind blown seeds from reaching the ground and rooting. Mulch however will not stop deep-rooted weeds from growing through it.

The mulch needs something underneath if it is to have any chance of stopping dock weed or dandelions. Weed control fabric is designed to do that job. It does so very well, but weed control fabric allows wind blown seeds to put roots down, through it, to the soil. These weeds cannot then be removed by hoeing, because the fabric stops the hoe cutting off the weed just below ground level.

landscape-paper is a new, lower cost, alternative to weed control fabric.

You roll out the landscape-paper onto your vegetable or flower garden. You cut 3 inch diameter holes in it and plant your annuals, cabbages and onions through the holes. Cover the landscape-paper with mulch and you have an attractive looking and totally weed-free vegetable garden or annual border.

landscape-paper comes in rolls 3 feet wide and 25 feet long. It is a pale brown color and it is biodegradable. The paper only lasts one season, but its low cost means that replacing it next season is no big deal.



For those who are growing organically landscape-paper is certified as suitable for growing organic vegetables because it contains no bleach or artificial additives.

If landscape-paper is not available where you live there are similar alternatives you might consider using.

Woodchip wallpaper is the first alternative, low cost, non-bleached paper with splinters stuck in it. It will cover the ground in exactly the same way and rot down into the Sprinkler System Installation Flower Mound soil after a year. Wallpaper rolls are only about 2 feet wide though, so by the time you have done more overlapping than with the wider landscape-paper your savings will be minimal.

The paper underlay designed for underneath carpets might be a better alternative. It has no splinters in it and it is usually 6 feet wide, meaning less is wasted through overlaps.

Sheets of newspaper will also do the same job of separating mulch from soil, but these will not stop deep-rooted weeds in the same way as the others will. Use color printed newspaper if you want them to rot down more slowly.

You can also use newspaper sheets where you are laying turf. Just put the newspaper down on top of the raked soil. Weigh http://ambler.temple.edu/events/ambler-campus-winter-garden-volunteer-days-1 them down with stones and leave them for a month. Most of the weeds will have died by the end of the month and you can just roll the turf out on top of the newspaper.

http://www.infobarrel.com/Landscape_Paper-101

Tuesday, 20 June 2017

John Deere Landscapes Unveils New Name as SiteOne Landscape Supply

ALPHARETTA, Ga.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--John Deere Landscapes today unveiled its new name and logo as SiteOne

Landscape Sprinkler System Supply, effective October 19. The new brand represents the

next step for SiteOne as an independent company after its acquisition by

Clayton, Dubilier & Rice in December 2013. With over 460 locations in

the U.S. and Canada, SiteOne is the largest wholesale distributor of

landscape supplies for green industry professionals in North America,

including irrigation supplies, fertilizer and control products,

landscape accessories, nursery goods, hardscapes, and outdoor lighting,

along with a broad array of services designed to help green industry

professionals operate and grow their businesses. SiteOne will formally

introduce customers to the new brand at the GIE+EXPO in Louisville,

Kentucky.



"As a market leader, our vision is to make our customers the most

successful landscaping professionals in the green industry--and that's

what our new brand represents," said Doug Sprinkler System Black, SiteOne's chief

executive officer. "We have over 2,500 passionate and knowledgeable

associates across North America, all focused on the success of our

customers. The new brand reflects our unique position as the only

national full-line provider of landscaping products which, along with

the deep knowledge and state-of-the-art solutions that we offer, will

form our foundation for future growth."



SiteOne's tagline, "Stronger Together" defines its partnerships with

customers, associates, suppliers and communities, and its commitment to

excellence in product offerings and service delivery. "By working

together with our suppliers and customers we can achieve great things

for all stakeholders," said Black.

The rebranding effort began shortly after the purchase of John Deere

Landscapes by Clayton, Dubilier & Rice. SiteOne performed an extensive

18-month branding process, which included gathering input from

associates, suppliers, customers and key stakeholders. The brand roll

out will be completed by December. "We have an exciting new look, with

the same ex ceptional associates who will continue to http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/outdoors/landscaping deliver the high

quality products and services our customers know and trust," Black said.

About SiteOne Landscape Supply LLC

SiteOne Landscape Supply

(formerly John Deere Landscapes) is North America's leading wholesale

distributor of landscape supplies for green industry professionals

including irrigation supplies, fertilizer and control products,

landscape accessories, nursery goods, hardscapes, and outdoor lighting,

along with a broad array of services designed to help green industry

professionals operate and grow their businesses. With over 460 locations

in the U.S. and Canada, the broadest product and service offerings, and

over 2,500 knowledgeable associates, SiteOne is committed to making its

customers the most successful landscape professionals in the green

industry.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20150814005051/en/John-Deere-Landscapes-Unveils-SiteOne-Landscape-Supply

Sunday, 18 June 2017

California water: End of the LA lawn (Opinion)

"We're so used to Southern California having these beautiful, lush lawns and palm trees and seasonal flowers," she told me by phone from Culver City, a suburb of Los Angeles, where she Sprinkler System Installation Greenville is general manager at a landscaping business called A Greener Tomorrow. But now, because of the drought and new water regulations, "I'm telling you, all I see is Arizona http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/ and Las Vegas."

"Who's going to be willing to pay?" she said. "You can't maintain a lawn!"



The idea of Los Angeles -- much less Bel Air and Beverly Hills -- ripping out its water-sucking lawns and oh-so-thirsty flowers is indeed a shock, especially if installing and maintaining those lawns is your livelihood. But consider the context : California is in an extreme drought. Snowpack in the state, one measure of how much water will be available this summer, is at an all-time low, at just 5% of normal. Rivers are running dry, as I found last summer on a three-week trip down the San Joaquin. With no water at the surface, farmers are turning below the ground, pumping out groundwater at such an alarming rate that the land actually is sinking. In some places, that's happening at the truly astounding rate of almost 1 foot per year.

I see where Uribe's coming from. The 35-year-old loves the colorful, landscaped version of Los Angeles. And she fears a drab, monochromatic future -- a blah city, all dirt and rocks.



But this is a crisis. And the California lawn is a reasonable casualty.

I applaud Gov. Jerry Brown's recent push to require all cities and towns to cut their water use by 25%. To help local entities with the new mandate, the state plans to support the replacement of 50 million square feet of lawns with drought-tolerant plants (otherwise known as "cash for grass"), create a rebate system so residents will get help replacing water-hogging appliances with more efficient models, require golf courses to cut water use, and ban watering the grass found on public street medians, among other provisions.

The total savings, according to the governor's office, will be 1.5 million acre feet of water over nine months. For context, 1 million acre feet is said by environmental groups to be as much water as 2 million families would need in a y ear.The state's focus on lawns makes sense given that grass and other landscaping account for up to 50% of all urban water use, said Ellen Hanak, a senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California. "It's nice for us to have trees and landscapes, but we could do that with half of the water," she said. "It's not like it's going to mean the end of our economy or the end of our way of life."

If anything, the requirements don't go far enough.

Each year, California uses 6 million more acre feet of water "than our rivers and aquifers can sustainably provide," according to a 2014 report from the Pacific Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council. Those groups found 14 million acre feet of water per year could be saved if a number of changes were made to the way cities and farms operate. Among the recommendations: More-efficient farming techniques, including drip irrigation and "smart irrigation scheduling," which waters crops exactly when and where they nee d it.

So Brown's plan won't fix California's water woes.

But it's an important start.

Next, the state should direct its focus to farms, which consume 80% of all human-used water in California and generate only 2% of the state's gross domestic product. It's reasonable, if politically tricky, for the state to focus more attention on the industry that consumes more water than any other. California can create a water budget that allows farms, people and fish to thrive.Much water can be saved with newer technologies, without forcing farmers to give up the land they use to grow crops, said Heather Cooley, water program director at the Pacific Institute.

She praised Sprinkler System Installation Greenville Brown's order as "a very positive step forward."

"California is facing a drought of epic proportions, and we need to work together to reduce the use of water so there's sufficient water for cit ies, for farms and for ecosystems," she told me. "We need to be preparing not only for this drought but for the next one."

And that's the crux of it.

This California drought has been extreme. But in the future, as the climate continues to warm, Cooley and others say the state likely will see more hot, dry years like this.

They won't seem so abnormal, sadly.

All the more reason it's good for California to deal with its grass problem pronto.

If it's smart, it can do so without looking like the Arizona desert.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/02/opinions/sutter-california-water/index.html

Home builders beating back fire sprinkler laws



In other states, sprinkler legislation died or is pending until next year, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Connecticut, for example, is deferring action until next year. A measure requiring automatic fire extinguishing systems in one- and two-family homes failed to make it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfNmypOk45k to a vote in the Public Safety and Security Committee.

Sen. Anthony Guglielmo, the committee's ra nking Republican senator, said legislators did not have enough information about the cost to builders and municipalities that would enforce the law. Legislators will take up the issue next year only after hearing the recommendations of officials and others brought together by the state Department of Public Safety, he said.

The International Code Council, an organization of building inspectors, fire officials and others who set building standards, recommended in 2009 that states and municipalities adopt codes requiring sprinkler systems in homes and townhouses less than three stories high. The regulations took effect Jan. 1.

The National https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfNmypOk45k Fire Protection Association has said sprinklers will particularly help young children, the elderly and the disabled by giving them time to escape burning homes.

Opponents of requiring sprinklers cite their cost -- and subsequent impact on home prices -- and voters' dissatisfaction with government mandates.

In Missouri, lawmakers extended for eight years rules that require builders to offer sprinklers but do not mandate them.

"Our main concern, in this housing market, is that the requirement for mandatory fire sprinklers could cost $7,000 to $15,000 per home," said Missouri state Sen. Eric Schmitt, Republican chairman of the Jobs, Economic Development and Local Government Committee. "In this market, it's very difficult to justify."

In New Hampshire, Gov. John Lynch tried to vetoed legislation that prohibited local planning boards from requiring sprinkler systems in homes as a condition of approval for local permits. The decision about whether to require fire sprinklers should remain a local one, Lynch said.

Legislators overrode the veto.

Sen. John S. Barnes, Republican chairman of the Public Municipal Affairs Committee, said the override vote was not easy because he typical ly favors local control. But he does not believe any government body should be ordering homeowners to install fire sprinklers.

"If I buy or build a house, I think I should decide whether I put in a sprinkler system," he said.

John A. Viniello, president of http://www.bhg.com/gardening/landscaping-projects/ the National Fire Sprinkler Association, said the process by which codes are approved is flawed. Codes regulating wiring, construction and other facets of home construction are informed by expert advice from industry and others, he said.

But when legislatures have a role in the process, codes too often are modified or scuttled, he said.

"Once the politicians get involved, it's over," he said.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/06/29/home-builders-beating-back-fire-sprinkler-laws.html

Saturday, 17 June 2017

Water tower spells "SEX" after painters take a break

SUSSEX, Wis. -- Thanks to an ill-timed painting break, a water tower emblazoned with the word "sex" is greeting https://id.pinterest.com/ drivers as they pass through a town in southeast Wisconsin.

The gaff turned up in Sussex, a village about 20 miles northwest of Milwaukee.

WTMJ-TV reports that workers painting the town's name on the water tower stopped midway through to allow the paint to dry Wednesday. They planned to finish painting the town's name Thursday.





One driver, Jessica Bruss, told the Milwaukee television station she "almost drove off the road" when her 8-year-old son pointed out the word as they drove past the water tower Wednesday on their way to his first baseball game.

"'Mom, why does that say sex?'" Bruss recounted her son saying. "I immediately thought, 'Not today, we're not having this conversation today.'"

Bruss says the unfinished paint work may be funny for adults, but added: "People should remember that kids are seeing it."

Resident Chris Aykroid wroteon his website that workers made the same mistake the last time the tower was painted in 1996, warranting a mention in Playboy.

2017 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/drivers-greeted-by-sex-on-water-tower-after-painters-take-a-break/

Friday, 16 June 2017

Rose Law Files Federal Lawsuit Against Aero Automatic Sprinkler Company

SAN JOSE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--In a federal class

action lawsuit filed last month, six professional fire sprinkler

fitters who worked for Aero Automatic Sprinkler Company, a subsidiary of

Kiewit Corporation, allege they were denied payment under the California

Labor Code of minimum prevailing wages, overtime wages, travel, daily

subsistence, health and welfare payments for work on at least five large

commercial construction projects. Rose Law also alleges the workers were

denied mandatory rest periods, and Aero failed to employ apprentice fire

sprinkler fitters on the public works projects, as required by

California law.

According to Rose Law, Aero Automatic Sprinkler Company has its

principal place of business in Phoenix, Arizona, maintains a branch

office California, and performs sprinkler work all over the United

States. Aero is wholly owned by Kiewit Corporation, an Sprinkler System Installation Richardson international

construction, engineering and mining company with North American

headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska. Kiewit is one of the largest

construction companies in the world. Aero has filed a Corporate

Disclosure Statement and Certificate of Interest in the federal lawsuit

on behalf of its parent Kiewit Corporation.



Rose Law alleges the workers installed fire sprinklers on private jobs,

including Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center in Thousand Oaks,

California and San Jose Regional Medical Center in San Jose, California,

and on public works projects including California Department of Veterans

Affairs (CalVet) Home in Fresno, CA and California Polytechnic

University (CalPoly) Center for Science in San Luis Obispo, California.

Any current or former employee of Aero may contact Rose Law for more

information.



The lawsuit, brought under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the

California Labor Code, and California's Unfair Business Practices Act,

seeks unspecified damages for the six named workers plus all other fire

sprinkler fitters employed by Aero during the last four years.

About Rose

Law -- Working Hard for Working People(TM)

The workers are represented by trial lawyers Joe

Rose and Lisa

Bradner of Rose Law, APC in Gold River, California. Rose and Bradner

help employees and unions http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/yard-garden/landscaping/ in labor law matters involving unpaid wages

and overtime, illegal discrimination, retaliation and catastrophic

injury. Joe Rose, a former firefighter, was named a Northern California

Super Lawyers Rising Star again in 2014 and Sprinkler System Installation Richardson teaches employment law at

Lincoln Law School of Sacramento.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20140721006377/en/Rose-Law-Files-Federal-Lawsuit-Aero-Automatic